Monday, August 18, 2014

#JusticeforMikeBrown Demonstration and Rally 6:30 PM August 18, 2014 at Lincoln University Solider's Memorial

EQUAL PROTECTION RALLY



Since  1909 the NAACP has fought the murder of Blacks.  Then it was lynching.


Now its cold blooded murder and the violation of Equal Protection laws that allow for the selective prosecution of those crimes.

The work is not over.  

#Ferguson Stood Up.

Jefferson City - lets stand together and ensure the rights of every citizen - every human - are protected and preserved.

Join us and many other important and distinguished organizations in Jefferson City in proclaiming the sanctity of human life and the demand for #JusticeforMikeBrown.

Demonstration and Rally
6:30 PM
Lincoln University - Soldiers' Memorial
August 18, 2014

Brought to you in part by:



Saturday, May 17, 2014

If you have never seen the MO state conference in action - you should - its amazing

To: All Adult, Youth and College Units
Missouri State Conference quarterly meeting
Place: Hilton Garden Inn, 3300 Vandiver Dr. Columbia, MO
Date: Saturday June 7, 2014
Time: 10:00 a.m.
Quarterly assessments are as follows :
Adult Units: $25.00 per person which includes break and lunch
Assessments: Kansas City and St. Louis City: $180.00 ea;  Unit Pulaski Co, Springfield, Jefferson City, St. Louis CO and Columbia $60:00 ea. (Adult) All other adult Units: $50.00 ea
All Youth Units assessments:  $25.00  and $15.00 ea in attendance which includes break and lunch
The Agenda will be forthcoming, all State Conference meetings will have training components.
See you June 7th.
God Bless,
Mary A. Ratliff, President Mo NAACP State Conference
211 Park Deville Dr.
Columbia, MO 65203
Ph: 573-881-0163

If an agenda comes out - we will post it.  

Our unit asked for meeting minutes and if we get them we are happy to share if your interested.

Let us know jcnaacp@gmail.com if your interested in attending.


FREE PICNIC WEDNESDAY MAY 21 6:30-8:30PM


Picnic Event!
Wednesday, May 21 from 6:30 – 8:30
Memorial Park Pavilion in Jefferson City


We are co-sponsoring this event with the Central Chapter of MASW!

Let’s debrief, discuss and ‘wrap-up’ the 2014 MO Legislative session!  Then continue to join hands as we fight for the people and issues we share in common!

We have much to talk about so let’s have some fun doing it!

This is a free picnic (brats, hotdogs and trimmings)!

More information will be arriving soon and we anticipate having a state office holder…. Area legislators will be invited to attend.  Our own Jeannette Mott Oxford will lead the discussion.

We look forward to seeing you!


FAST FOOD WORKERS WENT ON STRIKE ACROSS THE US AND NOT A WORD IN LOCAL NEWS

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, May 7, 2014
Contacts: Laura Brandon, laura.brandon@berlinrosen.com, 202-641-8477
Shannon Garth-Rhodes, shannongarthrhodes@gmail.com, 832-545-1851


Fast-Food Workers Announce 150-City Strike as Movement Goes Global

Campaign for Higher Pay Spreads to Nearly Three-Dozen Countries on Six Continents

NEW YORK—U.S. fast-food workers said Wednesday that they will walk off their jobs in 150 cities next week, while workers from dozens of countries on six continents announced they were joining the growing movement for higher pay and rights on the job at restaurants like McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s and KFC.

As the US workers strike May 15 for $15 and the right to form a union without retaliation, workers in 33 countries on six continents will hold protests at McDonald’s, Burger King and KFC, outlets, calling for higher pay and an end to abusive employment practices, the workers said Wednesday.

“We’ve gone global!” said Ashley Cathey, a McDonald’s worker from Memphis, Tenn., who makes $7.75 after six years on the job. “It’s amazing that our fight for $15 and a union has inspired workers around the world to come together. Our campaign is growing and gaining momentum, and the highly-profitable fast-food industry needs to know we won’t stop fighting until our voices are heard.”

The workers announced the strikes and protests outside a McDonald’s in Manhattan, and then delivered a letter to McDonald’s that called on the fast-food giant to raise wages and respect workers’ rights worldwide.

“On May 15, we will be taking action together around the world to demand that McDonald’s — the second largest private sector employer in the world—respect its employees’ work,” the letter read.
Earlier this week, workers and union leaders from dozens of countries met in New York City for the first-ever global meeting of fast-food workers, organized by the International Union of Food, Agricultural, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers' Associations (IUF), a federation composed of 396 trade unions in 126 countries representing a combined 12 million workers.
"The Fight for 15 in the US has caught the attention of workers around the world in a global fast-food industry where workers have recently been mobilizing,” said Ron Oswald, general secretary of the IUF. "It has added further inspiration and led them to join together internationally in a fight for higher pay and better rights on the job. This is just the beginning of an unprecedented international fast-food worker movement—and this highly profitable global industry better take note." 

In the US, strikes are expected in cities from Oakland to Raleigh, including the first-ever walkouts in Philadelphia, Sacramento, Miami and Orlando. Around the world, workers are planning major protests in at least 33 cities, spanning six continents. Some examples are:

Africa
Morocco: Protests at McDonald’s in Casablanca and Rabat
Malawi: Protests at fast-food restaurants

Asia
Japan: 30 protests at McDonald’s in 30 different prefectures
Hong Kong: a protest inside and outside a major McDonald’s
Korea: a protest at a major McDonald’s in Seoul
India: protests at fast-food restaurants in three cities
Philippines: flash mobs inside five McDonald’s
Thailand: protests at McDonald’s and KFC restaurants in Bangkok

Australia and Oceania region
New Zealand: teach-in by workers at McDonald’s corporate headquarters in Auckland

Europe
Belgium: Lunchtime protest at a major McDonald’s in Brussels
United Kingdom: Protests at McDonald’s in 20 cities
Germany: Protests at Burger King
Ireland: Protests at McDonald’s in Cork, Belfast and Dublin
Italy: A national strike at fast-food restaurants in Venice, Milan and Rome, to be held immediately following the US strikes

South America
Brazil: Protests at McDonald’s in five states
Argentina: Demonstration at McDonald’s in Buenos Aires

Central America/Caribbean
El Salvador: Protest at McDonald’s in San Salvador
Panama: Protest at McDonald’s in Panama City
Dominican Republic: Protest at McDonald’s in Santo Domingo



McDonald’s worker Louise Marie Rantzau, who plans to protest in Denmark, said: "In Denmark, McDonald's pays me $21 an hour and respects our union, so I was surprised when I heard workers in the US had to fight so hard for just $15 and better rights. Fast-food companies need to treat the people who make and serve their food with the same respect everywhere and workers in Denmark are committed to supporting the workers' cause until that happens.”

McDonald’s worker Frances Cabrera, who plans to protest in Argentina, said: "No matter where they live, fast-food workers want fair pay and rights on the job. In Argentina, we've won some rights, but still struggle to get by on low pay. After seeing the courageous actions of American fast-food workers demanding change, we were inspired to join the growing movement."

Julie Sherry, an organizer with Hungry for Justice, a campaign that started earlier this year to organize fast-food workers, and which plans 20 protests across the UK on May 15 said:  "Despite the huge profits made by fast-food corporations, the average fast food worker in the UK struggles to survive on just £5 ($8.50) an hour. McDonald’s, the leading player in the UK industry, boosts its mega-profits by forcing 90 percent of its workforce to live on zero-hours contracts, meaning workers have no guaranteed hours, but can be called in to work at the drop of a hat. In the UK, we are at the beginning of a battle to take on the multinationals dominating the fast-food industry, ensure workers know their rights, and open the door to organizing fast food workers into unions, and it's fantastic to be part of a global movement."

A campaign that began in New York City in November 2012, with 200 fast-food workers walking off their jobs demanding $15 and the right to form a union without retaliation, has since spread to some 150 cities in every region of the country, including the South—and now around the world. The growing call by thousands of workers for $15 and a union has been credited with elevating the debate around inequality in the U.S. When Seattle reached a deal last week for a $15 minimum wage, Businessweek said the city was “adopting the rallying cry of fast-food workers.”

As it spreads, the movement is challenging fast-food companies’ outdated notion that their workers are teenagers looking for pocket change. Today’s workers are mothers and fathers struggling to raise children on wages that are too low. And they’re showing the industry that if it doesn’t raise pay, it will continue to be at the center of the national debate on what’s wrong with our economy.  

recent National Employment Law Project report only added fuel to the fire, finding that low-wage job creation was not just part of our early economic recovery but is a trend that has continued four years into the recovery. The report's author, Michael Evangelist, told the New York Times, "Fast food is driving the bulk of the job growth at the low end…. If this is the reality — if these jobs are here to stay and are going to be making up a considerable part of the economy — the question is, how do we make them better?"

Not only is pay low, but fast-food companies are stealing from workers’ paychecks. Earlier this year, workers filed class-action suits against McDonald’s in three states, alleging widespread and systematic wage theft. A poll conducted by Hart Researchfound that 89 percent of fast-food workers experience wage theft. McDonald’s is being forced to act. In response to the suits, the company said it was conducting a comprehensive investigation; while in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, McDonald’s said worker protests might force it to raise wages this year. With shareholder meeting season upon us, and a recent report showing the industry has by far the largest disparity between worker and CEO pay, scrutiny on fast-food companies is bound to intensify. New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer has already said, “Excessive pay disparities pose a risk to share owner value," and that conversations around inequality should move into the boardrooms of profitable fast-food companies.

4th annual Missouri Housing Summit - sign up and help us locally

The 4th annual Missouri Housing Summit will be taking place on July 9th and 10th, 2014. It will be held at the Lodge of the Four Seasons in beautiful Lake Ozark, MO.

This year’s event will be once again hosted by the Department of Mental Health Housing Unit and the Missouri Housing Development Commission, while also working in conjunction with the Missouri Workforce Housing Association conference.

There is no registration cost to attend this event however, travel and lodging are on your own as an Attendee. The Lodge of the Four Seasons has a special room rate for this event and lodging arrangements can be made through them.

Information regarding this event and how to register can be found at:

Know a lawyer that needs a job?

Please post, http://media.ca8.uscourts.gov/files/2014CaseBudAtty-NOTICE.pdf

NOTICE
CASE BUDGETING ATTORNEY POSITION
The United States Courts of Appeals for Seventh and Eighth Circuits is seeking applicants for a Case Budgeting Attorney. The position will be headquartered in Chicago. The Case Budgeting Attorney will travel to other locations in both Circuits. Interested applicants may obtain an application by accessing the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit website at www.ca7.uscourts.gov or the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit website at www.ca8.uscourts.gov. Persons interested in applying for this position should send their applications to:

Collins T. Fitzpatrick
Circuit Executive
Judicial Council of the Seventh Circuit
2780 U.S. Courthouse
219 South Dearborn Street
Chicago, Illinois 60604

Applicants will be reviewed without discrimination as to race, color, sex, religion, or national origin. Applicants must be admitted to practice in at least one state court and be members in good standing of every bar of which they are members. The incumbent will work with the judges, court staff and defense counsel of the Seventh and Eighth Circuits in recommending case budgeting procedures, policy, and forms for Criminal Justice Act attorney representations in capital and other high cost cases. Additional duties, among others, will include developing and reviewing case budgets, and maintaining and analyzing a central database of those budgets and expenditures for private attorneys appointed under the Criminal Justice Act.

Applicants must possess excellent organizational, writing and communication skills, extensive knowledge of federal criminal law and the Criminal Justice Act and regulations, and ability to analyze fees and budgets. Applicants must maintain confidences. The term is for three years with potential for extension and the current salary is $100,690 - $157,000 depending on experience, salary and qualifications. The case budgeting attorney will be supervised by the Seventh and Eighth Circuit Executives. Applications are to be received by June 12, 2014.